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FlavorX

Backstory: Flavorx had been highly successful in providing flavorings for children’s medicines and had developed a range of flavorings for the veterinary market to make medicines palatable to animals.

Situation: Their research had shown that a very lucrative market was the pet industry and the difficulty in getting “pets to take their medicine.” They wanted to market this flavoring kit via veterinary product representatives to vets worldwide.

Creative Solutions: Giving the vets a sample seemed an obvious way to get the product into the hands of the vets – the flavors would be purchasable through representatives that dropped off the samples. The kit would include POP display posters as well as the flavorings. We developed a ‘sampler leaflet’ that provided a small vial of one of the flavors, like a perfume sample card. (Shown here).

20 of the sampler leaflets would then be placed in a Flavorx branded box to provide the veterinary reps with a supply to hand out to their veterinary customers. A branded calculator was included in each box as a gift for the veterinary reps. The promotion proved extremely popular with both the veterinary reps and the vets.

Using the visual approach and marketing messages from the sampler, a trade show display, an advertising campaign to appear in veterinary magazines and a poster campaign for veterinarian waiting rooms to increase product awareness among pet owners was developed.

Flavorx, which had been sending their vets a small monthly newsletter took our direction and created a full-fledged four-color quarterly news magazine featuring success stories, follow ups, “how-tos” from other vets and “letters to the editor.” This quarterly newsletter became their number one sales tool.

Results: Sales skyrocketed;  the popular “Flavorx” is now available at vets throughout the country.

(Gary James/Patrick Ind, creative/ art directors; Gary James, lead copywriter (ads), Patrick Ind, POP/newsmagazine; Jamie Stockie, graphic design)
Tim Kenny Marketing, Bethesda, MD; ICBM, Washington DC

POP | Branded promotional items | Trade show display | Newsmagazine | Posters | Print advertising |

our voYce

The concept was simple.

Everyone should vote on lots of stuff, and often.

A focus group was held at the offices of TopFloorStudio, here in Asheville, to see what people thought of the concept. The website was designed around some of that really great input. We also got a good understanding for the need of a “here’s how it works” graphic video presentation on the landing page.

Steffi Rausch (evolv.com) did the design of the web site and I did the content writing.

This is the embed presentation for the landing page (it lived in that grey box to the right on the home page) that I wrote and art directed, including the search for istockphotos. From the script I timed the visuals and used powerpoint to move through the presentation. I then handed over the assets to Indy film producer  Marcus VanWormer, who took time out of his busy schedule creating exceptional promotional videos to build the graphic presentation. The voiceover was through a production house in Michigan.

Unfortunately, our voYce had a brief life. I thought it was a great concept.

UPDATE: There is a online site that captures the essence called Thetylt.com. Check it out.

Web content | Project management of Video | Art Direction | Focus Group assistance | Public Relations

Two spaces after a period: Why you should never, ever do it. – Slate Magazine

I’ve been (or should I say HAD been) following a LINKED IN thread where the query was made, “one space or two” after the end of a sentence. Over 640 comments have been made, over and over, beating the dead horse.

Fact: anyone who was taught on a typewriter, was taught to put in an additional space at the end of the sentence because the font was fixed, ie the “i” took as much space as an “m.” So, to visually break up the sentences, you added an additional space.

With the advent of word processing and proportional fonts, there is no need for the additional space. Visually it is more appealing to use one space; additionally, the way your copy wraps or is set in a brochure, for instance, can change dramatically with the addition of extra spaces. 

For some reason people keep arguing about this. Now, I know this isn’t creationism vs. evolution, but to someone in the business of communication, it is relevant. 

Here’s a great article on the subject:

Two spaces after a period: Why you should never, ever do it. – Slate Magazine.

http://www.slate.com/articles/technology/technology/2011/01/space_invaders.html

Facebook Is Positioned To Take Over The World

Though this is an article about investing in Facebook when the IPO eventually launches, it is a good perspective on how Facebook has positioned itself to become a “virtual marketing world.” As a marketer, it is important to also understand how Facebook will effect everything that is done in creating advertising and public relations campaigns as we move forward.

Facebook Is Positioned To Take Over The World: Buy The IPO No Matter The Price – Seeking Alpha.

 

Tip Sheet: Five Steps to Aligning Strategy With Social Media :: PR News

Excellent tips on integrating a social media plan with an overall strategy.

Often I find that the strategy is overlooked. Please let me help you in creating it! A retainer usually can cover this stage, or we can build it into the project. But, don’t skip it. Tactics and “one-offs” aren’t going to help you with your brand, if you don’t integrate the entire strategy!

 

Tip Sheet: Five Steps to Aligning Strategy With Social Media :: PR News.

9 Ways To Improve the SEO of Every Website You Design

Thanks to a colleague for sharing this invaluable information! Great ways to make simple improvements with SEO. Some is fairly obvious, like keywords and updating content, but other ideas are a little less intuitive.
A good refresher, too, for anyone working with folks to help them increase webs presence. I have to do some of this myself!!!

9 Ways To Improve the SEO of Every Website You Design.

Seven Traits of Highly Effective Press Releases « BusinessWired

The information shared here through BusinessWire is straightforward and simple.

Crafting the message and content is obviously the most important factor in developing an excellent public relations and press release campaign.

When developing a press release, I try to incorporate at least Five out of Seven of  the traits that are outlined in the article. One that I leave out is based on budget; the other the goal of the release. Here are the 5:

1. One link in one form or another in the body of the release.

2. Emphasis on key points in the release via special formatting.

3. A subheadline.

4. Encourage sharing on social media

5. Special characters in the headline.

The two that are missing are:
1. The company name in the headline: It sort of depends on where the brand fits in the scheme of things.  After establishing the company branding, sometimes it’s better to focus totally on the message and support the company branding throughout the release.

2. A photo or video included: There are totally dependent upon the client’s budget as they almost always add some cost in distribution. However, these costs also vary widely, and there are many ways to get the message distributed within budgetary concerns.
If you need effective messaging, please give me a call.

Seven Traits of Highly Effective Press Releases « BusinessWired – Business Wire Blog.

Art Ulene Feeling Fine Launch

Feeling FineView News Release

The Vitamin line was launched on QVC. One of the premiums for purchasing was a subscription to Art Ulene’s monthly newsletter. Quite effective in 1997, this newsletter is now online and contains a myriad of information not available (or economically feasible) just a little more than a decade ago.

(Agency: Gail Becker Associates of FL, Inc; Gary James, writer/account manager; Trisha Kniffen, graphic designer)

Feeling Fine Newsletter issue 1

Feeling Fine Newsletter issue 1

Feeling Fine Newsletter 2

Feeling Fine Newsletter issue 2