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8 Articles

Smithsonian Institution

 

Project: Create a print advertisement promoting the entire Smithsonian Institution just one month after 9/11.

Execution: Reminded people that this is America’s attic of treasures – without referencing 9/11 directly.

Creative: Copywriting, Positioning: “Where everything old is new again.”

Result: The healing began; people started to come down to the National Mall again.

Newspaper, Local Washington, DC magazine

(as Creative Director, copywriter, Tim Kenny Marketing, Bethesda, MD)

FlavorX

Backstory: Flavorx had been highly successful in providing flavorings for children’s medicines and had developed a range of flavorings for the veterinary market to make medicines palatable to animals.

Situation: Their research had shown that a very lucrative market was the pet industry and the difficulty in getting “pets to take their medicine.” They wanted to market this flavoring kit via veterinary product representatives to vets worldwide.

Creative Solutions: Giving the vets a sample seemed an obvious way to get the product into the hands of the vets – the flavors would be purchasable through representatives that dropped off the samples. The kit would include POP display posters as well as the flavorings. We developed a ‘sampler leaflet’ that provided a small vial of one of the flavors, like a perfume sample card. (Shown here).

20 of the sampler leaflets would then be placed in a Flavorx branded box to provide the veterinary reps with a supply to hand out to their veterinary customers. A branded calculator was included in each box as a gift for the veterinary reps. The promotion proved extremely popular with both the veterinary reps and the vets.

Using the visual approach and marketing messages from the sampler, a trade show display, an advertising campaign to appear in veterinary magazines and a poster campaign for veterinarian waiting rooms to increase product awareness among pet owners was developed.

Flavorx, which had been sending their vets a small monthly newsletter took our direction and created a full-fledged four-color quarterly news magazine featuring success stories, follow ups, “how-tos” from other vets and “letters to the editor.” This quarterly newsletter became their number one sales tool.

Results: Sales skyrocketed;  the popular “Flavorx” is now available at vets throughout the country.

(Gary James/Patrick Ind, creative/ art directors; Gary James, lead copywriter (ads), Patrick Ind, POP/newsmagazine; Jamie Stockie, graphic design)
Tim Kenny Marketing, Bethesda, MD; ICBM, Washington DC

POP | Branded promotional items | Trade show display | Newsmagazine | Posters | Print advertising |

our voYce

The concept was simple.

Everyone should vote on lots of stuff, and often.

A focus group was held at the offices of TopFloorStudio, here in Asheville, to see what people thought of the concept. The website was designed around some of that really great input. We also got a good understanding for the need of a “here’s how it works” graphic video presentation on the landing page.

Steffi Rausch (evolv.com) did the design of the web site and I did the content writing.

This is the embed presentation for the landing page (it lived in that grey box to the right on the home page) that I wrote and art directed, including the search for istockphotos. From the script I timed the visuals and used powerpoint to move through the presentation. I then handed over the assets to Indy film producer  Marcus VanWormer, who took time out of his busy schedule creating exceptional promotional videos to build the graphic presentation. The voiceover was through a production house in Michigan.

Unfortunately, our voYce had a brief life. I thought it was a great concept.

UPDATE: There is a online site that captures the essence called Thetylt.com. Check it out.

Web content | Project management of Video | Art Direction | Focus Group assistance | Public Relations

Two spaces after a period: Why you should never, ever do it. – Slate Magazine

I’ve been (or should I say HAD been) following a LINKED IN thread where the query was made, “one space or two” after the end of a sentence. Over 640 comments have been made, over and over, beating the dead horse.

Fact: anyone who was taught on a typewriter, was taught to put in an additional space at the end of the sentence because the font was fixed, ie the “i” took as much space as an “m.” So, to visually break up the sentences, you added an additional space.

With the advent of word processing and proportional fonts, there is no need for the additional space. Visually it is more appealing to use one space; additionally, the way your copy wraps or is set in a brochure, for instance, can change dramatically with the addition of extra spaces. 

For some reason people keep arguing about this. Now, I know this isn’t creationism vs. evolution, but to someone in the business of communication, it is relevant. 

Here’s a great article on the subject:

Two spaces after a period: Why you should never, ever do it. – Slate Magazine.

http://www.slate.com/articles/technology/technology/2011/01/space_invaders.html

TKM2

Hired as an independent creative director and copywriter, my goal was to help to rebrand this 25+ year-old graphic and web design company.

The agency had built a strong print and point-of-purchase portfolio but was also moving into the 21st century with more website design. In addition, I had been hired to help craft an “integrated marketing” division.To achieve this, we needed to build a website that immediately reflected this new position.

In creating the positioning statement, “Be Seen. Be Heard. Be Noticed.  Be Remembered,” and crafting the message, “Strategic Creativity in a Marketing Driven World” the visitor immediately learned that there was more to the company than graphic design and print.

The talented graphic and web design team, led by Jamie Stockie Jones and Michael Caron, built the visual marketing campaign around that copy with icons representing those marketing goals, and refreshed the agency’s color theme with the bold use of yellow and grey.

Working closely with them, writing the content to reflect each of the featured items as well as the biographical information, history and other essential elements.

Though some of the copy has changed in the past 10 years, the positioning and branding has remained unchanged.